• Jul 12, 1928
    (b.) -
    Apr 16, 2006
    (d.)

Bio/Description

Co-founder of Teradyne, a Boston, Massachusetts-based manufacturer of automatic test equipment in 1960 with Alex d’Arbeloff, a classmate at MIT. They set up shop in rented space above Joe and Nemo’s hotdog stand in downtown Boston. The name, Teradyne, was intended to represent a very forceful presence. 1,000,000,000,000 dynes = 10 meganewtons (2,248,089 pounds-force or 1,019,716 kilograms-force). He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and graduated with an S.B. in EECS from MIT in 1948. During his eleven years as CEO of Teradyne, he is credited with designing more than 300 semiconductor and other test systems, including the J259, the world's first computer-operated integrated circuit tester. After leaving Teradyne in 1971, he moved to Aspen, Colorado, where in 1979, he teamed with artist Travis Fulton to create Aspen's "dancing fountain". He also designed a computer system without hard disks or fans; this system (the ON! computer) booted up in seconds, a much faster time than even the computers of today. In 2001, he was awarded the Telluride Tech Festival Award of Technology; and i 2005, he and his wife, Maggie DeWolf, were inducted into the Aspen Hall of Fame. He died in Aspen, Colorado at the age of 77.
  • Date of Birth:

    Jul 12, 1928
  • Date of Death:

    Apr 16, 2006
  • Noted For:

    Designer of more than 300 semiconductor and other test systems, including the J259, the world's first computer-operated integrated circuit tester
  • Category of Achievement:

  • More Info: